Nike is probably one of the few sneaker companies that is actively combatting bots on their site. They have spent millions on anti-bot measures, and are constantly trying new methods to ensure that only real people are buying their products.

Nike Swoosh – nike.com

In the past, when the SNKRS app was first introduced, people quickly found ways of hitting multiple pairs of shoes on hyped releases. They did this by buying many Nike+ accounts and using proxies (different IP addresses), and altering their address (commonly known as address ‘jigging’.

Most of these Nike bots worked by entering via Nike.com, not via the app. This is an important piece of information which I will explain later in the article.

SNKRS logo – apple.com

Nike’s first step towards removing bots was to require each account to be verified by a mobile phone. This was quickly beaten by bot users, as they made scripts to pull phone numbers from online phone number providers and auto verified them.

 

Shortly after SMS verification was required, Nike bots had their best run to date. Bots such as Kickmoji, BNB SNKRS and Ghost SNKRS destroyed Off-White drops.

Nike realised that they had to step up their anti-bot, and invested in anti-bot solutions such as Akamai. Akamai is now used by a lot of other sneaker companies, such as Footlocker, Footpatrol and more.

Ghost SNKRS – snkrs.ghostaio.com

Nike bots had a very dry spell after around June 2018, and the bots that used to be worth over a thousand dollars were now almost worthless.

BNB SNKRS was the first to make a comeback, and began cooking on some less hyped releases. I personally had some success with the bot when it was working again, and some of my more notable success included Slam Jam Nike Blazers and seven pairs of Off-White Air Max 90 TD.

My own success using SNKRS bots

So now, the main topic of this article is what are Nike bots like now in 2020? Well, the simple answer is that they are almost worthless again. Nike have began mass-resetting phone number verification of accounts, which meant that any account bought by a botter was now unable to enter SNKRS raffles. Another big move by Nike was the filtering of all Nike.com entries, and only allowing SNKRS app entries to win. This, as I mentioned before, was the main way Nike bots entered the draws, so this was a huge blow.

 

Nike bots are definitely not completely useless anymore. Nike decides when to enable hard filtering on drops, and its generally for the high hyped shoes, like Off White, Travis Scott or Sacai collaborations.

On smaller, but still profitable drops such as the Jordan 1 Mid Milan, bots saw widespread success as filtering was not too tough. Bots also work extremely well for people living in countries where the SNKRS app is unavailable, such as Canada and Brazil. This is because they can’t filter desktop entries out, as they are the only entries that come in!

Nike Bot User Success from Nike Canada – twitter.com/footiockercad

In my opinion, in 2020, unless you are from a region which does not have the SNKRS app, I wouldn’t recommend buying a Nike bot. It is quite a large investment when you factor in the price of the license of the bot, the proxies required and also the accounts needed to enter on a large scale basis.

For more information on which bots to buy or not to buy, I recommend keeping a look out for our Bot Guide, which will be releasing soon.

[optinform]